Posted by John
The Captain Of The Push

by Henry Lawson (1867-1922) Australian writer As the night was falling slowly down on city, town and bush, From a slum in Jones’ Alley sloped the Captain of the Push; And he scowled towards the North, and he scowled towards the … Read more

Continue Reading
Posted by John
Australia Federata

James Lister Cuthbertson (1851-1910) Australian poet Australia! land of lonely lake And serpent-haunted fen; Land of the torrent and the fire And forest-sundered men: Thou art not now as thou shalt be When the stern invaders come, In the hush before … Read more

Continue Reading
Posted by John
The Magic Pudding

Written and Illustrated by Norman Lindsay (1879 – 1969) . . . the story continues . . . Iwill,’ said Bunyip firmly. ‘All I ask is that you strike a dignified attitude in the presence of these scoundrels, and, at a … Read more

Continue Reading
Posted by John
The Shearing of the Cook’s Dog

by Henry Lawson (1867-1922) Australian writer The dog was a little conservative mongrel poodle, with long dirty white hair all over him – longest and most over his eyes, which glistened through it like black beads. Also he seemed to have … Read more

Continue Reading
Posted by John
Dot and the Kangaroo

by Ethel C. Pedley (1860 – 1898) . . . the story continues . . . CHAPTER 8 It was fortunate the Kangaroo could not think of all that might befall them, or she never could have had courage for … Read more

Continue Reading
Posted by John
Dot and the Kangaroo

by Ethel C. Pedley (1860 – 1898) . . . the story continues . . . In an instant Dot did what the bird directed, and thrust her little hands into the soft grass roots and moss, out of which … Read more

Continue Reading
Posted by John
Dot and the Kangaroo

by Ethel C. Pedley (1860 – 1898) . . . the story continues . . . All she heard was something like “try,” or “we’ll die.” She could not make out what the Kangaroo said, for the crashing of the … Read more

Continue Reading
Posted by John
Dot and the Kangaroo

by Ethel C. Pedley (1860 – 1898) . . . the story continues . . . The panting, trembling Kangaroo saw the approaching dog, also, and leaped down from the crag. As she dropped to earth, she stooped, and quickly … Read more

Continue Reading
Posted by John
Dot and the Kangaroo

by Ethel C. Pedley (1860 – 1898) . . . the story continues . . . They stopped in their headlong speed, shouting all together in their shrill voices, “The Bunyip! The Bunyip!” and they tumbled over one another in … Read more

Continue Reading